Mac os x user folder permissions

If you run into "Operation not permitted" errors on certain files, those files are probably locked. If you want to unlock them, run sudo chflags nouchg filename or sudo chflags -R nouchg foldername.

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Resetting permissions on multiple user folders Authored by: kal on Apr 14, '03 PM. Just a small refinement All of the user's executables will have the wrong permissions, but usually there are fewer executables than regular files Just a sub-tip Resetting permissions on multiple user folders Authored by: alexiskai on Apr 14, '03 PM. Resetting permissions on multiple user folders Authored by: nicola on Apr 15, '03 AM. You have already used nireport, so why not use niutil for getting a user's home directory? Resetting permissions on multiple user folders Authored by: mithras on Apr 15, '03 AM.

Hey thanks! Resetting permissions on multiple user folders Authored by: geordie on Apr 15, '03 PM.


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Resetting permissions on multiple user folders Authored by: mdentinho on Mar 04, '10 PM. Good Luck [ Reply to This ]. Resetting permissions on multiple user folders Authored by: elephantmanmusic on May 16, '10 PM. Resetting permissions on multiple user folders Authored by: agentx on May 17, '10 AM. I [ Reply to This ].

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Thanks, Rob [ Reply to This ]. Resetting permissions on multiple user folders Authored by: agentx on Sep 29, '10 AM. Search Advanced. From our Sponsor Latest Mountain Lion Hints Click here for complete coverage of Lion on Macworld.

Using Mac OS X, how do I repair permissions, and what does that do?

User Functions Username: Password:. This can cause confusion and can prevent access to files even though they appear with proper permissions in the Finder.

Because ACLs are not required for setting up the basic OS X account permissions and because they can actually prevent access to the account if set up incorrectly, you can remove them. The group, denoted by ":staff" is set to "staff" here because this allows permissions to be set for administrators in the system admins are members of the "staff" group ; however, in this procedure setting the group will not affect much since we are going to be setting the group's permissions to "no access" in the next step. Explanation : This command is the "meat" of the procedure, and is what will actually change permissions.

Once we've set up all files so permissions can be uniquely set for the specific account holder the "owner" , this command will grant access to all files in the directory only to that owner, and set the files' group associations the "group" and "everyone" to "no access". The "" in the command is a bitwise designation of permissions to the file's "owner" first digit, or "6" in this case , to the "group" second digit, or "0" in this case , and to "everyone" the third digit. The specific numbers will designate the permissions for those groups:. You can use alternate "symbolic" means for specifying permissions with chmod, and also use chmod to edit ACLs directly but this is beyond the scope of this tutorial.

For more information on how to set permissions with "chmod" you can search for the command on Google or enter "man chmod" in the Terminal. When these commands have been run, type " reboot " and press enter and the system will restart normally. At this point, the owner for the account should be able to log in and be the only one with access to any files in the account.

The name you enter when you log in to your Mac is the default owner of Shared folders and drives on that machine. The owner must be logged in to change permissions on his folders. Group: In Unix systems, all users belong to one or more groups. The group that includes everyone who has an account with administrator permissions on your Mac is called Admin.

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